A solid-state drive (SSD, also known as a solid-state disk although it contains neither an actual disk nor a drive motor to spin a disk) is a solid-state storage device that uses integrated circuit assemblies as memory to store data persistently.

SSDs have no moving (mechanical) components. This distinguishes them from traditional electromechanical magnetic disks such as hard disk drives (HDDs) or floppy disks, which contain spinning disks and movable read/write heads.[5] Compared with electromechanical disks, SSDs are typically more resistant to physical shock, run silently, have lower access time, and less latency.[6] However, while the price of SSDs has continued to decline over time,[7] consumer-grade SSDs are still roughly eight to nine times more expensive per unit of storage than consumer-grade HDDs.

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